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Challenge "Number Sequence — Part 10"

Challenge "Number Sequence — Part 10"  

  By: admin on April 18, 2018, 4:56 p.m.

How many experience points does Thomas need to reach the 200th level of his new computer game?
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Re: Challenge  

  By: ExAstris on May 21, 2018, 8:06 p.m.

Do I read the equation correctly ?

p = l * x * 2^(l/y) / e

where p represents the experience points, l the level,
x and y integers (from 1 to 100), and e = 2.71828… (Euler's number)

Thanks

Re: Challenge  

  By: AnLeRo on May 23, 2018, 12:06 a.m.

Yes, that's correct.

Re: Challenge  

  By: ExAstris on May 25, 2018, 12:50 a.m.

Thank you AnLeRo !

Re: Challenge  

  By: haegarq on June 6, 2018, 9:38 a.m.

… die Genauigkeit von [HTML_REMOVED] ist von [HTML_REMOVED] abhängig und damit hängt auch das Ergebnis davon ab. Fünf Nachkommastellen von [HTML_REMOVED] sind zu wenig.
… the accuracy of [HTML_REMOVED] and of the result depend on [HTML_REMOVED]. Five positions after decimal point of [HTML_REMOVED] are not enough.

Re: Challenge  

  By: ExAstris on June 13, 2018, 3:12 a.m.

I used ellipses to indicate that I had more significant digits than 5,
my problem is that I had more than a thousand digits, without success.
I am surprised, because the problem looks simple and should be easy to solve. I tried both floating and integer division on l/y. With my long Euler number, I get about 25 matches out of 80.
There are only 10000 pairs of (x,y) for each level, so it should definitely be tractable.

Thanks for the tips.

Re: Challenge  

  By: be on June 14, 2018, 7:48 p.m.

… my problem is that I had more than a thousand digits, without success.

Could you send me the results you calculated and the source code of the program used. I'll have a look at it then. (I checked the challenge solution before using SageMath and it worked well).

Re: Challenge  

  By: sexton on July 2, 2019, 8:59 a.m.

I used ellipses to indicate that I had more significant digits than 5,
my problem is that I had more than a thousand digits, without success.
I am surprised, because the problem looks simple and should be easy to solve. I tried both floating and integer division on l/y. With my long Euler number, I get about 25 matches out of 80.
There are only 10000 pairs of (x,y) for each level, so it should definitely be tractable.

Thanks for the tips.

Managed to do it with Python using "math.e". No idea how many digits that has.

Re: Challenge  

  By: Bart13 on July 16, 2019, 1:38 a.m.

I had no problem solving this challenge with Excel…


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